India Exclusion Report, 2018-19

978-93-83968-34-3

Three Essays Collective, 2019

242 pages

Price INR 500
Book Club Price INR 400
SKU

India Exclusion Report is a widely collaborative effort involving institutions and individuals working with a shared notion of social and economic equity, justice and rights. The report seeks to inform public opinion around exclusion and the role of the state; and to influence policy making towards creating a more inclusive, equitable and just society. It is also meant to bring to the fore particular vulnerabilities faced by marginalized communities and groups, their lives and struggles. This endeavour seeks to support public action for the greater inclusion of and justice for the oppressed and the marginalized people of India.

LWB779

India Exclusion Report is a widely collaborative effort involving institutions and individuals working with a shared notion of social and economic equity, justice and rights. The report seeks to inform public opinion around exclusion and the role of the state; and to influence policy making towards creating a more inclusive, equitable and just society. It is also meant to bring to the fore particular vulnerabilities faced by marginalized communities and groups, their lives and struggles. This endeavour seeks to support public action for the greater inclusion of and justice for the oppressed and the marginalized people of India.

As with earlier editions of the India Exclusion Re-port, this report looks closely at the condition of four extremely dispossessed and oppressed social groups. By listening carefully to their voices, and viewing their situation with both empathy and scholarship in the ways the writers do so admirably, we hope in these successive reports to build a granular picture of the experience of India’s most vulnerable populations of dispossession and exploitation, and of the state. These extremely vulnerable social groups selected for study in this Exclusion Report are waste workers in a town in South India; residents of riverine islands in Assam, called Chars: out-of-school adolescents in Telangana; and circular migrants from Araria in rural Bihar.

This report also examines closely four public good, and asks which groups are excluded from these public goods, what is the consequence of these exclusions, what is there in the design and implementation of law and policy which results in such exclusions, what are good practices of inclusion, and therefore what is it that we recommend for re-form in public policy in each case to lead to greater inclusion.