Forms Of Collective Violence

Riots, Pogroms, And Genocide In Modern India

Paul R. Brass

9788188789412

Three Essays Collective, New Delhi, 2006

184 pages

Price INR 250.00
Book Club Price INR 188.00
SKU
pro_702

These essays focus on the various forms of collective violence that have occurred in India during the past six decades, which include riots, pogroms, and genocide. It is argued that these various forms of violence must be understood not as spontaneous outbreaks of passion, but as productions by organized groups. Moreover, it is also evident that government and its agents do not always act to control violence, but often engage in or permit gratuitous acts of violence against particular groups under the cover of the imperative of restoring order, peace, and tranquility. This has certainly been the case in numerous incidents of collective violence in India where curfew restrictions have been used for just such purposes. In this context, secularism constitutes a countervailing practice, and a set of values that are essential to maintain balance in a plural society where the organization of intergroup violence is endemic, persistent, and deadly. About The Author: Paul R. Brass is Professor (Emeritus) of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. He has published fifteen books and numerous articles on comparative and South Asian politics, ethnic politics, and collective violence. His work has been based on extensive field research in India during many visits since 1961. His most recent books are The Production of Hindu-Muslim Violence in Contemporary India (2003), Theft of an Idol: Text and Context in the Representation of Collective Violence (1997); Riots and Pogroms (1996); and The Politics of India Since Independence, 2nd ed. (1994).

Paul R. Brass

Paul R. Brass is Professor (Emeritus) of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. He has published fifteen books and numerous articles on comparative and South Asian politics, ethnic politics, and collective violence. His work has been based on extensive field research in India during many visits since 1961. His most recent books are The Production of Hindu-Muslim Violence in Contemporary India (2003); Theft of an Idol: Text and Context in the Representation of Collective Violence (1997); Riots and Pogroms (1996); and The Politics of India Since Independence, 2nd ed. (1994).