Tagore's Ideas of the New Woman

The Making and Unmaking of Female Subjectivity

Edited by Chandrava Charkravarty, Sneha Kar Chaudhuri

SKU

‘A rich compilation of essays from stalwarts in the field, revealing how the women in Tagore’s varied representations straddle the public/private spheres depicting the myriad moods of the feminine, from the abstract to the concrete, from the empowered to the romantic.’ - Abhijit Sen

LWB546

‘A rich compilation of essays from stalwarts in the field, revealing how the women in Tagore’s varied representations straddle the public/private spheres depicting the myriad moods of the feminine, from the abstract to the concrete, from the empowered to the romantic.’ - Abhijit Sen

This book theorizes the continuous reconfigurations—‘making’ and ‘unmaking’—of female subjectivity in Tagore’s life, his times, and his works. This transhistorical approach in the book makes gender formations and discourses of the past relevant and necessary to the understanding of postmodern gender issues and ideologies.

A unique feature of this compilation is the variety of genres that it covers, ranging from Tagore’s poems, dance dramas, dance forms and their innovative uses, the gender-specific nature of several Rabindrasangeet, his travel writings and paintings, to highlighting the postmodern reworks of Tagore’s novels on celluloid. On the whole, this edited collection with its extensive focus on the issues of gender, heterosexual love, marriage and patriarchy in relation to the works of Tagore strengthens the claim that the politics of culture and the gendering of social subjectivity were intrinsic to the representative ideologies of literature of the nineteenth and twentieth century.

Chandrava Charkravarty

Chandrava Charkravarty is Professor, Department of English, West Bengal State University; her interests are the complex connections between gender construction, identity and nation-building in various forms of canonical and non-canonical texts. Among her recent books is Gendering the Nation: Identity Politics and the English Stage of the Long Eighteenth Century (2013). Recent articles are ‘The “King” in Rabindranath Tagore’s Drama’, in the Politics and Reception of Rabindranath Tagore’s Drama, A. Bhattacharya and M. Renganathan, eds (2015); ‘Connecting Hemispheres, Playing with Distance: Rammohan Roy, an Indian Transnationalist’, in The Idea of Experience of Distance in the International Enlightenment, Kevin Cope, ed. (forthcoming).

Sneha Kar Chaudhuri

Sneha Kar Chaudhuri is Assistant Professor of English, West Bengal State University and Guest Faculty at Department of English, Jadavpur University; formerly Assistant Editor and current Editorial Board member of Neo-Victorian Studies, UK. Her areas of specialization include Neo-Victorian Studies, Victorian literature, postmodern and post-colonial fiction. Her post-doctoral research interests are Adaptation Studies, Gender Studies, Trauma Studies, and popular culture and films.